Day 8 … Hubbard Glacier

Hubbard Glacier

Hubbard Glacier … This is actually leaving after the fog had lifted … this looks really nice full screen, just click on the pic!

Today was an at sea day with a very early morning trip to visit the Hubbard Glacier.  When I woke up I was a little disappointed to see we were in the middle of a fog bank.  We had a lot more fog on the trip than I thought we would but as it turned out the closer we got to the Glacier the sunnier it got and we ended up with almost perfect conditions!

Getting closer!

Getting closer!

In my first Alaska post I had posted a pic of a Humpback Whale breaching.  This was the only one I saw on the entire trip and was happy when it jumped a couple of times.  This guy was playing around just as we were entering the ice field to the glacier.

Humpback Whale

Humpback Whale

Humpback Whale ... One of the pictures I had hoped to get while visiting Alaska!!

Humpback Whale … One of the pictures I had hoped to get while visiting Alaska!!

The drive in towards the glacier was really neat as they let us go up to the helicopter landing area for a really good view of the glacier.  We passed so many very cool icebergs and I may end doing a post of all the shots Terri and I got of the ice … here’s a small sample.

Crystal looking ice

Crystal looking ice

Blue Ice ... The reason the ice looks blue is that the ice absorbs all the different colors of light but only the blue color escapes.

Blue Ice … The reason the ice looks blue is that the ice absorbs all the different colors of light but only the blue color escapes.

The captain of the ship did a fantastic job of getting the ship really close to the glacier.  The Hubbard Glacier is nearly 7 miles across and 350 feet thick from the water line up and 250 feet below the water line.

The following is from Wikipedia … It takes about 400 years for ice to traverse the length of the glacier, meaning that the ice at the foot of the glacier is about 400 years old. The glacier routinely calves off icebergs the size of a ten-story building. Where the glacier meets the shore, most of the ice is below the waterline, and newly calved icebergs can shoot up quite dramatically, so that ships must keep their distance from it as they ply their way up and down the coast.

It is really hard to get a feel for how absolutey huge the glacier is.  That is 350 feet of ice showing!!

It is really hard to get a feel for how absolutey huge the glacier is. That is 350 feet of ice showing!!

We spent a couple of hours near the glacier and it really was a humbling experience.  It’s like seeing Niagara Falls or Yosemite National Park for the first time … awe-inspiring.

Just a couple more pics from yesterdays sail away from Skagway …

How cool would it be to live and work out at this light house!

How cool would it be to live and work out at this light house!

and lastly, we saw hundreds of Bald Eagles on our trip and while I photographed many of them, some really close and others at quite a distance I thought this one was kind of an iconic shot of the views you see on a cruise to Alaska.  Remember clicking on any of the pictures will enlarge them and optimize it for your computer screen.

Eagle and a Glacier ...  Alaska at it's most wonderful!

Eagle and a Glacier … Alaska at it’s most wonderful!

Thanks for visiting and God Bless … the next blog will be our travels from Seward to Denali National Park!

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About sheriffsmith

I have worked for the Broward County Sheriff's Office the last 13 years and spend most of my free time birdwatching / naturewatching and photographing the birds and nature that I encounter. I believe God has blessed us with a world that is so absolutely fascinating and wonderful and I'm doing my best to discover and show others all that he has provided us with in nature.
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2 Responses to Day 8 … Hubbard Glacier

  1. Wondering who the Hubbard Glacier is named after?

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